Mike Stebbins and Bob Zanni

Table of Contents
  1. Policy Statement
  2. Procedures
  3. OPAC Instruction
  4. Bibliography Instruction
  5. Dewey Decimal Classification Instruction
  6. Works Cited

1. Policy

To ensure that all students understand the need for proper citations and bibliographic notations, and to make sure all students are familiar with the use of the DDC and the OPAC system in the Seneca Valley High School Media Center, direct instruction will be given to all English classes in 9th, 10th, and 11th grade.

2. Procedures

*Meet with administration and/or guidance to determine total number of English classes for grades 9-11.
*Meet with English department to create a schedule for the library literacy lessons.
*plan sessions with individual English classes for grades 9-11.
*coordinate lessons with overall library schedule.
*Prepare materials for grades 9-11 library presentations.
*Confirm library presentation equipment is in working order.
*Follow-up lessons with pop-quiz to be given by classroom teacher in the class period following direct instruction.
*Assess impact of lesson throughout the year by observing student skills as they work in the library.
*Revise lessons as needed for the following year based on quiz results and on student observations.

3. OPAC Instruction






4. Bibliography Instruction





5. Dewey Decimal Classification Instruction











6. Works Cited

Childress, Dawn. “Citation Tools in Academic LIbraries: Best Practices for Reference and Insruction.” Reference & User Services Quality 51.2 (2011): 143-152. Education Full Text. Web. 9 May 2012. This article details a study conducted by Penn State University librarians involving various citation tools being used by students and staff and how these could be incorporated into reference and instruction settings. Their findings present a best practice list of available resources.



Dewey, Melvil. Abridged Dewey Decimal Classification and Relative Index. Dublin:Online Computer Library Center, 2004. Print.


Harris, Benjamin R. “Credit where Credit is Due: considering Ethics, ‘Ethos,’ and process in Library Instruction on Attribution.” Education Libraries 28.1 (2005): 4-11. Library Information Science & Technology Abstracts. Web. 9 May 2012. This article explores the need for instructing students in the how and why of using sources to augment and improve the quality of their written academic work. The article examines how this instruction has been written out of many writing courses to make way for other academic work as many teachers feel the internet is going to be used as a major source. A good source on the art of teaching and why it is important in terms of timing and setting.


Harris, Christopher. “It’s Not about the Hardware.” School LIbrary Journal 53.8 (2007): 20. Teacher Reference Center. Web. 9 May 2012. This article focuses on a specific media specialist and her efforts to use SMART technologies to augment her lessons. Specifically the article details her efforts to teach Dewey shelf order. A useful resource that could be expanded to include teaching a variety of library skills.

Hudelson, Nancy. “Dewey Decimal System.” School Arts 102.6 (2003): 30. Teacher Reference Center. Web. 9 May 2012. This brief article describes the use of an art lesson used to teach students library skills including the Dewey Decimal System. A good resource to expand on for teaching the DDS to various elementary grade levels.


Riskin, Shelley. “Dazzling Kids with Dewey.” School Library Journal 49.11 (2003): 41. Education Full Text. Web. 9 May 2012. This article focuses on the overall uses of the Dewey system including classification of information sources, Dewey subjects, and the visual Dewey display.


Rosenblatt, Stephanie. “They can find it but they don’t know what to do with it: Describing the use of scholarly literature by undergraduate students.” Journal of Information Literacy 4.2 (2010): 50-61. Library Information Science & Technology Abstracts. Web. 9 May 2012. This article examines a 2 part research study. Part 1 focuses on the quality of sources cited by undergraduate students. Student work was analyzed to see if students who attended library instruction session were more likely to use quality sources than students who did not attend. The study found that students could find materials, but in part 2 of the study it was determined that the majority of the students lacked the skills to synthesize the information.